The ancient Spice

The ancient spice

Saffron has been a famous spice used for thousands of years. It consists of the stigmas, by themselves or together with the styles, of the flowers of Crocus Sativus Linnaeus, whether we refer to the whole filaments or we have them mashed or ground.

Today the different qualities of saffron are governed internationally by the ISO-3632-1/2 and following rules. "See data sheet".

Saffron contains some active ingredients that are inherent to this spice, among which we should point out the following: “crocin” which provides the color, “picrocrocin”, which is responsible for its taste, and “safranal”, which gives it its unique aroma.

Saffron also contains essential oils with therapeutic properties that may be obtained by applying three different processes that are proof of the good quality of the saffron grown in Spain.

How to use saffron in cooking.

- Saffron threads or filaments.

Place dry saffron within a mortar in order to mash it together with the other spices. Add to the food but save 5 / 6 threads for a brighter and more colorful presentation of the dish later on.

- Ground saffron.

The Saffron Company

Dissolve ground saffron in some liquid and add to the food while cooking it.

Recommended amounts:

A sachet with 0,125 gr. / 0.004oz of ground saffron or about 15 threads serve 4 to 6 people.

You can also use saffron to your taste and keeping in mind possible combinations with other spices or ingredients.

USES OF SAFFRON:

MEDICINE

In homeopathy it is used as an expectorant, to fight cough; as an appetite stimulant, as a sedative or as a tea in order to fight the aches or symptoms when teething.

It is used in Ayurdevic medicine as part of the herbal formulae.

It is antidepressant.

It relieves discomfort associated to the menstrual cycle.

It works as an aphrodisiac to help fight impotence.

It is a stimulant and it helps digestion and the functions of stomach in general.

It soothes the pain of dentition among children.

It alleviates insomnia and inebriation.

ITS MEDICAL USE MUST ALWAYS BE LOOKED OVER BY A HEALTH PROFESSIONAL. PLEASE DO NOT SELF MEDICATE.

PARFUME:

Saffron is used in the perfume industry as an ingredient of quite a few well-known perfumes. In the Middle East saffron is used in the preparation of an essential oil named Aafran Attar, a mixture of saffron and sandalwood.

RELIGION:

The Saffron Company

When Hindi women carry out their prayers they receive saffron as a blessing, a symbol of good luck and good will.

All over India saffron is often used as an offering in many worship places. We know that some ancient sacred texts were written with a saffron-based ink.

Saffron has always been highly appreciated as a present in worldwide celebrations including India’s New Year, Diwali (Festival of Lights), the Onam Festival or even Christmas.

COLOURS:

Buddhist monks use saffron to dye their robes. In India brides often use it as make-up for the wedding ceremony. In Japan it is used to hand paint kimonos.

FOOD INDUSTRY:

Saffron is used in many kinds of different dishes: soups, masala spice mixtures, ice cream, spirits or milk kesari.

AROMATIC TOBACCO

Saffron is used in the elaboration of an aromatic tobacco chew from India called Zaafrani Zarda